A Slice At A Time - ASIMOV'S (July 2002) Honourable mention, Year's Best Science Fiction #20

View Of A Remote Country - ON SPEC (Spring 2004)

Suitable for the Orient - ASIMOV'S (February 2003) Honourable mention, Year's Best Science Fiction #21

A Game of Three Halves SCHEHERAZADE (Issue 26 2004)

Return Stores - REALMS OF FANTASY (February 2003) Agent of God - SCHEHERAZADE (Date unknown - sorry!)

Does He Take Blood? - REALMS OF FANTASY (August 2003) Honourable mention, Year's Best Science Fiction #21

The Final Demand of the Sun - SCHEHERAZADE (Issue 25 2003)

The Man Who Did Nothing - REALMS OF FANTASY (June 2003) Year's Best Fantasy & Horror #17. (Also Honourable mention, Year's Best Science Fiction #21)

Omega Squad: Targets - STAR WARS INSIDER #81

In His Image - INSIDER VADER SOUVENIR GUIDE

A Two-Edged Sword - STAR WARS INSIDER #85

Omega Squad: Odds - STAR WARS INSIDER #87

Strings - REALMS OF FANTASY (October 2003) Honourable mention, Year's Best Science Fiction #21

Death, Taxes and Mackerel - ON SPEC Spring 2002

Orchids - NEVERWORLDS, 1999

Chocolate Kings - ON SPEC (Fall 2002) Honourable mention, Year's Best Science Fiction #20

Nanny Estate - NEVERWORLDS, 1999

An Open Prison - ON SPEC (Winter 2003)

The Last Penny - published in SPACEWAYS WEEKLY and winner of its Readers' Choice award for August 2000.



SHORT FICTION

After a brief flurry of stories when I first started writing, I gave up short fiction some time ago, except for specially commissioned work for franchises and other nice little earners from time to time. Apart from those rare exceptions, SF/F shorts are poorly paid (I'm talking pro rates, too) and now seem to be read mostly by other writers and would-be writers. Fine if you want a mention in Locus: not fine if you want hundreds of thousands (and preferably millions) of bookstore customers to grab your work and hand over the cash for it. I'm not sure exactly when short SF started to decline as a market, but it was long before I started writing, and when I worked out exactly the level of loss I'd run at if I took time out from other stuff to write it these days, I had to lie down in a darkened room for a while.

The ideas that I once turned into shorts now become either novels or comics. In the time it takes me to write a short, I can write a third of a novel, or two comics, or several levels of a game, or even a complete script. They pay. And, much more to the point, a lot more people will experience them.

Sooner or later, I'll get around to collating my own-copyright short fiction in e-book format as an experiment to see the business model at close quarters. Until then, this is just a "shortiography" for the record.